The Final Book: Gods.

Mythology. Blasphemy. Transcendence.

"SW Hammond's debut novel is an epic story with exquisite prose and the depth and scope of meticulous research." –SA Schlueter

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Jones' Formula of Literary Criticism

Jones Formula of Criticism

Here’s a much different way of looking at art and storytelling—perhaps a method that your editor or writing group may never have considered, or succinctly explained.

I’m going to share with you a formula created by Dr. Todd Jones that explains what makes good art and literature. Jones is a celebrated philosophy professor with a significant background in anthropology.

Jones’s BeDE Theory of Art Criticism:

Art or literature’s only function—the only thing it is good at doing—is creating beliefs, desires, and emotions (or BeDE for short). Art fails at doing anything and everything else.

The BeDE theory is designed to tell you which works of art are comparatively better than other works of art in its class, based on how well it performs its function of creating beliefs, desires, and emotions within its audience.

What makes something “art” is a social fact—such as the concept of money or Tuesday. Society agrees that “x” is art, and therefore it becomes art.


Read more: Jones' Formula of Literary Criticism

Three Fourths Home: A Melancholic Chat With Mom

Video Game

Hold on… Can’t type—my trigger finger has a cramp from holding down R2 two hours straight…

I’m don’t know what Three Fourths Home was supposed to be, but it definitely shouldn’t have been a video game. There was nothing about this story that warranted it being played or visualized in this medium. The graphical element of a car driving through cornfields added nothing to the story, the controls and playability added no feeling or connection with the characters—if anything these components distracted from the plot and created a barrier between the “player” and what the story was trying to convey. To me, this story could have easily been a novel or perhaps a film—as a video game it was a frustrating and underwhelming experience.

So let’s break it down—all that’s on the screen is a silhouette of a car and stick-figure cornfields that you drive through during a thunderstorm. And when I say “drive”, I use the term loosely as you simply hold the gas (R2) and the car drives for you—no steering or anything fancy like braking. During this time, a phone conversation is had by an early 20 something female and her parents. The only thing of importance in the game is this conversation, so naturally to you begin to ignore the driving car, the corn, and thunderstorm and focus on reading the dialog. However, you must be driving (holding R2) in order for the conversation to continue—tape down the button, because it’s a long, uneventful ride.

I will give them this—the dialog does seem authentic. Whoever wrote the story is either from or spent a lot of time in Nebraska as they nailed the cadence of speech and expressions of the region. Beyond that, as a human interest story goes, it lacked the “interest” part. It’s a character piece with way too little connection with the characters. The protagonist, Kelly, is obnoxiously eye-roll-snotty mixed with the dissatisfied realization of a long-sigh-welcome-to-adulthood.

Read more: Three Fourths Home: A Melancholic Chat With Mom

Video Games

Storytelling & Writing: 50% - 1 votes
Graphics: 11% - 1 votes
Controls & Playability: 6% - 1 votes
Soundtrack & Audio: 38% - 1 votes
Je Ne Sais Quoi: 11% - 1 votes

23% - An Empty Cornfield Of Game Space

Three Fourths Home just didn’t accomplish anything. It wasn’t fun, engaging, entertaining, moving, or thought provoking. The story has potential, but it never should have been a created as a video game–it would have connected much better as a book or b-rate movie.

Three Fourths Home: A Melancholic Chat With Mom

Three Fourths Home: A Melancholic Chat With Mom

Hold on… Can’t type—my trigger finger has a cramp from holding down R2 two hours straight… I’m don’t know what Three Fourths Home was supposed to be, but it definitely shouldn’t have been a video game. There was nothing about this story that warranted it being played or visualized in this medium. The graphical element of a car driving through cornfields added nothing to the story, the controls and playability added no feeling or connection with the characters—if anything these components distracted from the plot and created a barrier between the “player” and what the story was trying to convey. To me, this story could have easily been a novel or perhaps a film—as a video game it was a frustrating and underwhelming experience. So let’s break it down—all that’s on the screen is a silhouette of a car and stick-figure cornfields that you drive through during a thunderstorm. And when I say “drive”, I use the term loosely as you simply hold the gas (R2) and the car drives for you—no steering or anything fancy like braking. During this time, a phone conversation is had by an early 20 something female and her parents. The only thing of importance in the game is this conversation, so naturally to you begin to ignore the driving car, the corn, and thunderstorm and focus on reading the dialog. However, you must be driving (holding R2) in order for the conversation to continue—tape down the button, because it’s a long, uneventful ride. I will give them this—the dialog does seem authentic. Whoever wrote the story is either from or spent a lot of time in Nebraska as they nailed the cadence of speech and expressions of the region. Beyond that, as a human interest story goes, it lacked the “interest” part. It’s a character piece with way too little connection with the characters. The protagonist, Kelly, is obnoxiously eye-roll-snotty mixed with the dissatisfied realization of a long-sigh-welcome-to-adulthood.
Hold on… Can’t type—my trigger finger has a cramp from holding down R2 two hours straight… I’m don’t know what Three Fourths Home was supposed to be, but it definitely shouldn’t have been a video game. There was nothing about this story that warranted it being played or visualized in this medium. The graphical element of a car driving through cornfields added nothing to the story, the controls and playability added no feeling or connection with the characters—if anything these components distracted from the plot and created a barrier between the “player” and what the story was trying to convey. To me, this story could have easily been a novel or perhaps a film—as a video game it was a frustrating and underwhelming experience. So let’s break it down—all that’s on the screen is a silhouette of a car and stick-figure cornfields that you drive through during a thunderstorm. And when I say “drive”, I use the term loosely as you simply hold the gas (R2) and the car drives for you—no steering or anything fancy like braking. During this time, a phone conversation is had by an early 20 something female and her parents. The only thing of importance in the game is this conversation, so naturally to you begin to ignore the driving car, the corn, and thunderstorm and focus on reading the dialog. However, you must be driving (holding R2) in order for the conversation to continue—tape down the button, because it’s a long, uneventful ride. I will give them this—the dialog does seem authentic. Whoever wrote the story is either from or spent a lot of time in Nebraska as they nailed the cadence of speech and expressions of the region. Beyond that, as a human interest story goes, it lacked the “interest” part. It’s a character piece with way too little connection with the characters. The protagonist, Kelly, is obnoxiously eye-roll-snotty mixed with the dissatisfied realization of a long-sigh-welcome-to-adulthood.
23 out of 100 with 5 ratings

Life Is Strange: The Perfect Storm

Life Is Strange Cover

Life Is Strange became a perfect storm of teenage angst, friendship, and hipster quirkiness backed by thoughtful storytelling and a heart-in-throat twist.

The story takes place in a struggling fishing village in the Pacific Northwest; a setting that plays seamlessly with hipster-savvy characters and strong female leads. You take control of our budding photographer protagonist, Max, on her 18th birthday as she’s recently enrolled in prestigious art-driven boarding school for gifted students. In the opening scene she has a crazy premonition and discovers that she has ability to control—reverse—time. It’s awesome. It’s every indie stereotype personified in a cataclysm of so much sugary-pop goodness that it hurts your teeth and rots your mind—only to later sideswipe you with depth and soul.

Read more: Life Is Strange: The Perfect Storm

Video Games

Storytelling & Writing: 94% - 1 votes
Graphics: 61% - 1 votes
Controls & Playability: 72% - 1 votes
Soundtrack & Audio: 90% - 1 votes
Je Ne Sais Quoi: 97% - 1 votes

83% Pac North West Quirkiness With Gripping Depth

Life Is Strange is a total character piece. The game lives or dies by its characters and their relationships–and this game not only lives, but it transcends. Fantastic storytelling with gripping twists, compelling and well-researched universe, and thoughtful soundtrack; this game is solid and my favorite in a long time. The characters are highly relatable and realistic, with the philosophy of time-travel well thought out. Think of it as an interactive television show that is be experienced (not so much "played").

Life Is Strange: The Perfect Storm

Life Is Strange: The Perfect Storm

Life Is Strange became a perfect storm of teenage angst, friendship, and hipster quirkiness backed by thoughtful storytelling and a heart-in-throat twist. The story takes place in a struggling fishing village in the Pacific Northwest; a setting that plays seamlessly with hipster-savvy characters and strong female leads. You take control of our budding photographer protagonist, Max, on her 18th birthday as she’s recently enrolled in prestigious art-driven boarding school for gifted students. In the opening scene she has a crazy premonition and discovers that she has ability to control—reverse—time. It’s awesome. It’s every indie stereotype personified in a cataclysm of so much sugary-pop goodness that it hurts your teeth and rots your mind—only to later sideswipe you with depth and soul.
Life Is Strange became a perfect storm of teenage angst, friendship, and hipster quirkiness backed by thoughtful storytelling and a heart-in-throat twist. The story takes place in a struggling fishing village in the Pacific Northwest; a setting that plays seamlessly with hipster-savvy characters and strong female leads. You take control of our budding photographer protagonist, Max, on her 18th birthday as she’s recently enrolled in prestigious art-driven boarding school for gifted students. In the opening scene she has a crazy premonition and discovers that she has ability to control—reverse—time. It’s awesome. It’s every indie stereotype personified in a cataclysm of so much sugary-pop goodness that it hurts your teeth and rots your mind—only to later sideswipe you with depth and soul.
83 out of 100 with 5 ratings

Legally Married With Children: A Conversation

Legally Married With Children

See no evil. Hear no evil. Speak no evil.

While there is absolutely no moral equivalency being drawn between good and evil—right and wrong—this exposé on same-sex marriage and modern families is completely about turning a blind eye. How I looked the other way—simply because everyone else did. We are afraid to ask the simplest of questions just because of the way it makes us feel. Ignorant. Confused. Fearful of the future. A whole host of complex questions that require considerable thought, vulnerability, and stirs deep emotions.

Meet Ginger; a longtime family friend and who would be the closest thing I have to a sister. My dad and her dad have been friends since the mid 1970s. They met while at work; my dad being a construction manager and her dad, David, owning a painting company. The two played competitive softball with each other for many years. As the stories go, it was a tight-knit group of friends and the ballgames were much more than obsession—it was their life. My mom had a significant role in Ginger’s young life, acting as an close-to-the-family babysitter for her and her brother for several years. Ginger’s mom and dad were always very much involved in her life, but appreciated the extra help while working full-time jobs and managing softball teams. Eventually I was born and my mom looked after all three of us. Though I was only a toddler, Ginger was my favorite and I followed her around like a duckling.

Read more: Legally Married With Children: A Conversation

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